Central Basin Municipal Water District

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December 2018 - Posts
According to recent studies conducted by UCLA, our wetlands could disappear entirely by the end of the century, unless immediate action is taken. Wetlands serve a vital role in shielding shorelines, improving water quality, providing recreational opportunities, and protecting endangered species and plants. California’s coastal wetlands are currently one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet and are beginning to diminish due to a climate-change driven rise in sea level, pollution, and stress from development.             The National Research Council estimates that by 2100, sea levels will rise over 5 ½ feet due to climate change causing icecaps to melt. Others have predicted an even faster rise. On October 18, 2018, the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project partners approved a strategy titled “Wetlands on the Edge,” which focuses on restoring the wetlands immediately since restoration projects can take approximately 20 to 40 years to fully complete.             The project will not only restore, but may even create more wetlands and would not have to remove homes or buildings. Requirements of the project include changes to coastal infrastructure such as reconfiguring bridges and removing levees, changes which would need to be made eventually. The public has invested over $500 million over the past half-century which has resulted in improved water quality in areas such as the Santa Monica Bay. Close to home, several wetlands located in Orange and Los Angeles counties would have significant improvements through this plan. The strategy will guide restoration, in an effort to reduce the risk of losing habitat.  
Posted by kelsey.coleman  On Dec 18, 2018 at 9:53 AM